Core group meeting minutes Nov 17

FILM NIGHTS

– New suggestions (from Linda):

  • Chasing Coral, freely accessible on the net (and Netflix)
  • Chasing Ice (but costly to screen)
  • Modified (non GMO labelling in US and CA)
  • Just Eat It (food waste in US and CA)
  • Greenpeace Film Festival

We the Uncivilised (suggested by Karen) – showing in Lewes at “The Depot” on Wed 29th Nov at 20h – could somebody go and check whether it is worth bringing to Hastings

Issue of cost of movie rental, but this could be covered by donations or a small ticket (e.g. £3 per person)

As a side suggestion – Karen suggests sending a podcast with each newsletter, invited everyone to send through interesting podcasts

Location:

  • The Palace – available for free
  • Electric Palace – charge

ACTION: Linda to follow up and check cost of screening for her suggested titles

UPDATE ON QUAKERS MEETING (Sherry)

  • Great wealth of experience in community work
  • Interest in partnering up with TTH
  • Training in New Economics (3-year project)
    • Keen on sharing this through open reading / training groups

OLD BATHING GROUND AREA (Update from Ken)

  • Issue is still outstanding and a decision should be taken by Xmas
  • Site in question still needs work done on it before the Council could sell it
    • Some asbestos contamination
    • Brief from Council is to have lots of affordable housing + a leisure element

FOOD WASTE CAMPAIGN (Update from Chris)

  • Discussion stuck – Peter Chowney not showing clarity about issues at stake
  • Lots of outstanding issues in the email track that need addressing – of which food waste is a small issues compared to the entire procurement process
  • Further updates to come

 

ITEMS ON THE AGENDA

ADMIN

Complete signed constitution

  • Some items still need to be added by Chris before final version can be circulated

ACTION: Sarah and Chris to finalise

Clarification of roles –Co-Chairs, Co Secretaries to meet separately to clarify division of roles

Monthly meetings: first Monday of the month, postponed by a week if it falls on a Bank Holiday. Next meeting on Monday 4th December

ACTION: Sarah to book meeting room for next meeting

MEETING WITH NEW STATION MANAGER (Alison) – see Appendix I

SECOND WATER BUTT

  • Small water tank already bought
  • Aim to install a second tank in parallel
  • Quaker fund to possibly contribute £400
  • SouthEastern also suggested they might contribute but unwilling to commit a clear budget

“DONATION PILE” at the garden (suggestion by Linda)

  • Should we have an area where any excess produce by any individual can be brought and offered to the community
  • Objection is that it takes time and effort to build a dedicated structure

SIGN-UP SHEET for “Leaders” at the garden sessions

ACTION: Sarah to review dates for fortnightly sessions and update sign-up sheet

ENERGY GROUP MEETING on 9th NOVEMBER

  • Kate to report at next Core Group
  • Looking at establishing a project at the Pier to generate energy through kinetic action of waves on a platform

COMMUNITY COMPOSTING

  • If the council is not willing to do this, should community initiatives be started instead ?
  • Chris to look around the country at community recycling initiatives
  • Lidia suggests to contact allotment associations and check if they could collect household food waste

EVENTS

  • Friday 24th at the Beacon, 18.00-22.00. Talk on “Climate Change, The Anthropocene, & Language – Nicholas Royle & Alex Lockwood In Conversation”.

ACTION: Green Drinks: Karen to arrange with Scott and Anna (possibly again in Ore?)

ACTION: Karen to put together next issue of newsletter

FUNDRAISING

  • Bags of Help (Tesco) to subsidise a mosaic from a local artist outside SLQ station – still waiting to hear from them (£2.000 for winner, £1.000 for runners-up)
  • Trinity Wholefoods offering £500 – to apply for funding for new tools
  • Could somebody check with B&Q and other DIY / garden centres for possible contributions
  • A volunteer was found to cut out a “COMMUNITY GARDEN” sign in individual letters to go on the railings

MEMBERSHIP

  • HVA contributed more detail to the updated constitution
  • Discussion:
    • Should we have a database of “members” including areas of interest / skills to coordinate action groups
  • Sarah mentioned the intention to publish a directory of groups and companies doing community work in specific areas to coordinate efforts
  • We could be suggesting monthly contributions (Standing Orders) form members

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT HASTINGS

ACTION Update from Laurie to be put on the agenda for next month

FINANCE

  • £518 total balance between bank and cash
  • TRIODOS bank account – Chris to look into conditions for TTC to transfer the account over to them (and conditions for a community account)

AOB

  • Local resident (LC) applying for an Arts Council funding for an event in December
    • Possibly in the building of the “Old Italian” restaurant
    • Suggesting a Xmas present swapping event – but objection to this is that we should be actually fundraising for cash rather than swaps.
  • HULL (CITY OF CULTURE) is using lights to make tower blocks more attractive – could be applied to Pier – mentioned by Sherry
  • Local resident (PO) (illumination schemes internationally) would like to establish a “trade show” for renewable projects on the Pier – mentioned by Sarah
  • SPICES – COMMUNITY CURRENCY – mentioned by Sherry
    • Recycling earns you time credits to incentivise positive behaviour
    • Time credits can also be exchanged at partnering organisations (eg college training, “paintball events”…)
    • Suggestion to start a time-bank in Hastings ?

 

 

Your Plants Will Grow High Next Spring When You Use These Autumn Gardening Tips

By Clara Beaufort

Horticulture knows no such thing as time off. There’s work to do right now if you want your flowers and vegetables to enjoy lush, healthy growth when warm weather returns. Use the tips in this post as your guide to gardening success.

Clean up the Dirt

Start your autumn chores by removing dead or dying plants from your garden beds. Give the remains a close look-see for evidence of mold or blight. If you see such signs, then burn the infected plants. If you don’t, then add them to the compost pile so they can work for you all winter long. Remove any foreign matter and give the soil a good, deep raking or tilling to break up clumps and aid aeration. Taking these steps now will lay the groundwork for next year’s harvest, according to the experts at Mother Earth News.

Mulch in Moderation

Too much of anything is a bad thing; that includes mulch. You should add a thin layer to your beds on top of 1-2 inches of compost. Anything more can actually work against you by preventing the cold from killing mold and blight.

While you’ve got your hands in the dirt, remove the roots of weeds like Bermuda grass and nutsedge. Otherwise these pests can overwinter in your garden to menace you next year, according to the gardening gurus at DIY Network.

Water Ahead of Time

Hard winter soil can block rain and melting snow from nourishing the roots of your trees and shrubs, according to Better Homes and Gardens. So get the jump on frost by giving these plants a generous watering now. This will act like the hump on a camel’s back, providing much-needed moisture throughout the cold season.

Don’t Forget Your Lawn

Autumn is for fertilizing your grass. Turf can store nutrients over the winter, digesting them in a gradual process that will help to ensure greener results next spring. You should aerate your lawn before winter cold sets in.

Consider Planting Cover Crops

Plants like hairy vetch and cereal rye can safeguard your soil over a long, severe winter, making them good choices for cover crops. Just make sure you till them into the ground next spring before they go to seed. This is a favorite trick of organic gardeners, according to Rodales. The seeds are small and even modest rainfall can help to establish them in the soil, making this idea almost effortless to implement.

Handling Hardscape Maintenance

The term “hardscape” refers to stone walkways, retaining walls, and other non-organic elements of a garden or landscape design. While less fragile than living plants, these structures do need annual care. This should include:

  • An autumn inspection to correct imperfections that could lead to trouble down the road. For example, a crack in a walkway might seem like a small thing. But it may become a trip hazard should water enter it and freeze, forcing the stone or masonry to expand. You should also look, not only for cracks, but for soil or stone cavities alongside or under hardscape. Otherwise wintertime precipitation could fill the gap and turn to ice, creating a problem called “frost heave” which can damage or even destroy hardscape.
  • A general sweeping to remove foreign matter, followed up with a washdown from a garden hose or pressure washer. This will discourage the growth of mold or mildew, which can deface hard surfaces.

Performing these needed steps will protect your garden and your landscape features from winter’s wrath. So give it your best, then brush off the dirt off your pants and start planning for next spring.

 

Guest blogger: Clara Beaufort

Gardenergigs.com

Writers in conversation at the Beacon, Hastings

Join Transition Town Hastings and Energise Sussex Coast for an exciting evening featuring two writers with their eyes firmly fixed on climate change, the Anthropocene and, of course, language. Nicholas Royle and Alex Lockwood will be reading from their recently published books and will take questions around the topics discussed. The Beacon will also open their kitchen for a special vegan dinner that can be bought after when the conversation can continue.

See the event page for more details and a link to book tickets.

Green space for Ore Community Land Trust

Ore Community Land Trust (OCLT) has a stated purpose of  “Seeking to acquire land in the Upper Ore Valley to save and enhance urban woodland and green space for community use and to protect animal habitat”.

OCLT was set up in 2009 and is now registered as a Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO). This widens their scope as they are keen to take on other green spaces and woodland in the Ore Valley, although their primary aim is to bring Speckled Wood into community ownership.

The organisation’s recent AGM reported the following activities:

1) HBC is planning to transfer the green spaces in the Ore Valley over to OCLT.
2) OCLT are in the process of buying a container as a volunteer base in Speckled Wood. They need more volunteers to support this.
3) OCLT are working with TCV to organise some green gyms in Speckled Wood. The first one will be for women.

Read more in the Ore CLT Annual Report AGM 2017

Gardening And Your Health: How Working In The Dirt Can Have A Positive Impact

Gardening is a favorite pastime for many people, but it’s not just a hobby that yields pretty results; it’s also a great way to get in shape and improve your mental health at the same time.

Working in the sunshine, creating something beautiful that also has tangible rewards, and doing something physical after working in an office or other fairly inactive environment can have many benefits for your health, not the least of which is the fact that you get in a workout every time you go into the garden. Bending, kneeling, stretching, weeding, watering, planting, and reaping all take a measure of physical strength and endurance and allow you to work several muscle groups at once, which makes it a great activity for those living with arthritis or joint pain because you can customize your movements and only do as much as your body will let you.

Of course, having a garden also benefits the planet in many ways, so you really can’t go wrong. If you’ve never thought of yourself as someone with a green thumb, now may be the time to reconsider and get to planting. Here are some of the best benefits of having a garden and tending it.

You get to work outside

Working outside in the sunshine gives you a boost of vitamin D, which has been shown in studies to help with stress, depression and other mood disorders. Gardening allows for plenty of fresh air while giving you the option to work only as hard as you want, so it can be done by just about anyone, regardless of their abilities or mobility concerns.

You’ll eat healthier

If you choose to plant edibles in your garden, pick things you know you’ll eat so that nothing goes to waste. Tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and peppers are all great options that are relatively easy to grow depending on your climate, and you can harvest quite a few of them. Think about foods that you can grow nearly year-round, as well; beans, broccoli, turnips, and squash are great choices for a fall harvest.

If you’re interested in year-round crops, you might also consider building a solar greenhouse that will help you keep your plants healthy and abundant during all kinds of weather. Make sure you have the space in your yard and check with the city to see if you need a permit to build.

You can boost your mental health

Many people who garden report a positive boost in their mental health, especially people who spend a lot of time in an office setting or don’t get to work with their hands much. There’s something relaxing about working in the dirt and knowing which move comes next, spending time choosing the right plants and watching them grow under your care, and it can help boost your self-esteem, as well.

It can help your memory

Seniors who garden are more likely to battle the risk of Alzheimer’s and other cognitive function disorders because the act of working outdoors and planting helps the brain stay active and vital. Not only that, but many studies have shown that people who work in the garden have a reduced risk of stroke.

Remember that gardening can include heavy lifting and other physical work, so ask for help if you need it. Always wear sunblock and wear light-colored layers of clothing in the summer to stay cool. Being prepared and careful will help you get the most benefits out of working in the dirt.

Maria Cannon © 2017

Transition Town Hastings ~ Meeting Minutes 20/09/17

Projects

Garden:

  • explanation of garden project – where we are at
  • Open Day 22nd Oct 12-3pm
  • Alex explained that Quakers do small grants (£400) we could use towards a water butt – we would have to raise another 400 as the cost is 800.

Energy Group:

  • Ken reported 3 ideas being explored
  1. Hastings Pier – to make it an electric generator/ renewably run
  2. twinning with German town Schwerte
  3. Wasn’t sure ? But maybe Anthony’s idea of mapping all the solar power in the town and connecting it?

 

Chris connected with someone from Wave Energy – talked about wave machine on pier.

Possibility of a feasibility study for a scheme across Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings. Approx cost of study is £10,000. Chris going to look into it more – connect with Richard and ESC! Think Chris will be attending the next Energy group meeting.

ACTION: Karen – add Chris to mailing list (DONE)

 

Packaging:

Karen explained the project we had in mind, starting with survey to assess the current situation with local food takeaway businesses

Possibility of affinity scheme to get a discount from eco packing companies with a mass order

Problems we came across were needing more people and support but also, what would happen to the packaging when disposed of? Compostable materials cannot go in landfill waste or recycling.

This lead to a discussion about food waste collection in Hastings and the petition to ESCC by the Green Party.

Should TTH partner with GP to help push this forward before pursuing the packaging project?

ACTION: Chris to send Karen info from Judy Scott (GP Secretary) about food waste petition and Karen to mail out to members

Ken mentioned the new sports complex proposed for Filsham Valley area – could this be a good place for an anaerobic digester?

ESCC contract with Kier has come to an end – good opportunity to push for alternative waste disposal?

 

Janice: unsure about what should happen to all the recycling – not always clear. Info from Veolia trip would be useful – FORGOT TO MENTION THERE IS SOME INFO ON THE TTH WEBSITE!

 

Events

AGM:

  • 21st Oct 10-12 @ White Rock Hotel
  • speakers: Gabriel Carlyle from Fossil Free Hastings/Divest East Sussex
  • possibly TT Deal
  • Sherry; are we sending out official invites to HBC and local councillors/stakeholders?

Energy Day:

  • 1066 energy campaign day on the Stade 10th Sept
  • not much said on this but some attendees were there – said it was good, collected some signatures for FFH

Film Nights:

  • after AGM now – hoping to get someone to volunteer to organise
  • Felicity and Richard suggested showing new Al Gore film – maybe first and second
  • Sassie suggested ‘We the Uncivilised’ – really good but makers want £100 to show film and give a talk Q&A. We could take donations/small charge on the door again?

Other:

  • Felicity – Hastings Supports Refugees event organised for 27th Sept ‘Hastings Debates’ hoping to be a regular event. Would help the interconnection of groups in Hastings. TTH to promote. ACTION – Felicity to send digital copy of poster to Karen who will share with mailing list

 

  • Alex; Quakers event at Friends Meeting House Sat 7th Oct (evening), ‘preparing people for the next economic collapse’
  • plenary session and Q&A inviting 4 groups to speak including TTH
  • focus on resilience

ACTION: Sherry to send info to core group

 

A.O.B

 

Ken – Ore CLT & Heart of Hastings CLT, Old Power Station Site in Ore Valley. Bill Dunster (eco housing guy) involved

Feasibility study to connect greenway from hastings station to Ore Valley (is this correct I can’t read Chris’ writing!?)

 

Old bathing pool site (west St Leonards) up for sale – perfect for a CLT – do we know anyone in that area? Encourage community in that area to set up a CLT. HBC have £200,000 sitting in the bank to be spent on CLT’s – already given money to HoH CLT and Ore CLT

 

ACTION: Karen speak to Mat and Tom and contact HBC to ask for an info pack on the site and send to Ken.

 

Discussion about Eco Pods for the homeless. Empty properties in Hastings

 

Sherry: Well-Being event this weekend. Looking for case studies of people being brought together in a positive way – HSR picnic? Felicity?

 

Summary of Actions

 

CHRIS P: send Karen info from Judy Scott about food waste campaign

KAREN: add Chris R to mailing list (done), mail out food waste petition info to members of this meeting & a Mailchimp to gather support, send out Hastings Debates promo to mailing list, speak to Mat & Tom about bathing pool site and contact HBC to request info pack

FELICITY: email Hastings Debates poster to Karen

SHERRY: send info about Quakers event to core team

 

Meeting Adjourned.

Next Meeting tbc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t miss the bus on climate change: make pensions fossil free!

On Saturday 23 September campaigners from across East Sussex will be boarding one of the Big Lemon’s sustainable buses for a one-day tour of East Sussex, taking the message about fossil fuel divestment – and the Divest East Sussex petition – to Hastings, Bexhill, Hailsham, Eastbourne, Seaford, Crowborough, Uckfield and Brighton.

If you’d like to come and see us off on the day – and take part in the photo call, featuring one of the Big Lemon’s sustainable buses – then please meet us by Hastings pier at 9.15am on Saturday 23 September.

“If we want to avoid 2C, we have very little time left. The public should be very concerned.” – Adrian Raftery, co-author of the recent scientific paper ‘Less than 2 °C warming by 2100 unlikely’, Nature Climate Change, 31 July 2017.

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT?

We’ve already seen global warming of over 1 degree centigrade.

The resulting climate change is now leading to increasingly severe impacts – from rapidly melting sea-ice at the poles to 50 degree heatwaves in India and drought in California. The UK is also seeing serious impacts – with increasingly severe flooding in almost every region and country in the UK in recent years – and it’s going to get much, much worse.

Unless, that is, we take action NOW to ensure that most of the known deposits of fossil fuels (oil, coal and gas) are left in the ground unburnt, and replace them with cleaner sources of energy.

LET’S NOT MISS THE BUS ON CLIMATE CHANGE

East Sussex County Council (ESCC) currently has £150m of local people’s pension monies invested in fossil fuels. These investments are a disaster for the climate as well as a financial risk for local people’s pensions.

Hastings Borough Council, Lewes Town Council and Brighton & Hove City Council have all called on ESCC to get rid of these investments (‘divest’).

Add your voice to the calls for divestment by signing the petition to divest the East Sussex Pension Fund and join us on 23 September if you can (see below for our schedule).

Together we can send a strong message to the ESCC that it’s time to move our money away from the problem and into the solutions.

More info here.

Save the date! 1066 Energy Campaign Launch

Join us for our Big Happy Sun-day on Sunday 10th September 10am–4pm, outside the Stade Hall in Hastings Old Town. A day of family fun and celebration as we launch the 1066 Energy Campaign for Local Energy.

The jam packed day will include free interactive games for children such as solar boat making, cycle powered smoothies, toy car racing and our solar cinema! This will run alongside fun for all the family such as a morning salute to the sun yoga session, music, singing, massage, giveaways and more.

Transition Town Hastings is part of the group launching the 1066 Energy campaign for local energy to power the local economy.

Contact kate@energisesussexcoast.co.uk for more details or visit www.energisesussexcoast.co.uk