Mosaic building this week!

We’ve made a start on the community mosaic, involving local school children, Gizmos children’s club, clients from the Seaview Centre and volunteer local residents. Here are some photos to give you a flavour of how it’s looking.

There is still a lot to do! Please help us complete this lovely piece of community artwork – lots of times you can pop into Zoom Arts this week:
Mon 15 July 2.30–4.30pm
Tue 16 July 1.30–4.00pm
Wed 17 July 2.30–4.30pm
Thu 18 July 2.30–4.30pm
Fri 19 July 10.00–12.30pm and 1.30–4.00pm

Mosaic beach walk

We had some great feedback on the beach walk on June 3rd where locals looked for things to draw for the mosaic design.

Here are a few photos and a poster with the times and dates of the mosaic making workshops.

We hope to publish the design developed by Emma Harding very soon.

Register an event for free for Sustainability on Sea 2019

www.sustainabilityonsea.org.uk/register-your-event/

The time has come for businesses and local groups to get involved with our eco-friendly festival: Sustainability on Sea.The festival will take place between Saturday 21st-Sunday 29th September 2019, culminating in an all-day Big Green Fair with stall holders, information stands, talks, activities for children and entertainment.

The theme this year will be “What we can do” showcasing the meaningful things we can all do to live more sustainably.

Last year we had a whole mix of events from speaker events, beach cleans, walks, bike rides, work- shops and family fun days.

It’s a chance for individuals to share their interests and get others involved, for businesses to organise events to bring new customers through the door and for green organisations to showcase what they do.

We welcome all ideas! Here’s some more inspiration:

  • A day of learning about climate change at a youth group or school.
  • Planting a community space.
  • Walks and cycle rides.
  • Litter picks and tackling plastic waste.
  • A day of sustainable food at your café.
  • Plant based food cookery lessons.
  • Launching a campaign.
  • Eco fashion show.

What people thought of last year’s Sustainability on Sea Festival:

“Well organised lots of information” “Great! Lots of useful info, goodies and optimism”  “All  stalls very interesting – not too texty or selling”  “Loads for kids, very interested in electricity and bikes” “Really useful – good to see a very diverse range of groups” “Absolutely excellent! Lovely to see the level of optimism” “10/10 would come again”

We’ve had an extremely positive response to our call out already. Local people are very aware of the issues around climate change and are keen to get involved in the festival.

Read the FAQs for more info.

To get involved please email: info@sustainabilityonsea.org.uk or call Kate on 07840 485344. Or simply sign up today:

www.sustainabilityonsea.org.uk/register-your-event/

Deadline for inclusion: 20th July 2019

Mosaic project underway!

Things are getting exciting now that we have collected all the drawings from the community. They will be the foundation for the design created by Emma Harding, the mosaic artist. Watch this space…

Volunteer to help with mosaic workshops

We’ve been working hard fundraising and we are very happy to say we (that’s the community/public/everyone!) are going to create the Mosaic at Warrior Square Station this summer.

This will consist of 11 days of workshops from 10th-19th July at Zoom Arts (right by the station and the mosaic site).

We would love your help at the workshops.

It would be easy things like:
Getting room ready
Doing some of the mosaic- most important!
Watching that people don’t put their grubby hands on the artwork!!!
Keep an eye on things not getting too messy in general
Sweeping floor occasionally
Keeping table and work area clean & regularly wiped
Showing people where toilets are
Equipping people with aprons/shirts etc
Giving out refreshments

Also there is a Beach Walk early June to help with the design.

We are having a prep & training session for volunteers on Thurs 11th July from 7-9pm– can you come along?
Email info@transitiontownhastings.org.uk.

(Illustration of mosaic is not final design)

Volunteer at our community garden!

The new growing season is upon us and we are looking for keen volunteers to help the team at the community garden in St Leonards Warrior Square train station.

The garden has raised beds for vegetables and lots of fruit tress and bushes where we are growing food that the public can help themselves to. We want to improve the area around the station as well as show how you can eat more sustainably by growing organic foods collectively in the local area.

Generally, we alternate weekly between Saturday (10-1) and Sunday (3-6) but always check the events page before coming to a session!

Or email info@transitiontownhastings.org.uk if you have any queries.

Helps us win Tesco’s #BagsofHelp fund

Our new project Meet you by the Mosaic has been shortlisted for a public vote in Tesco’s #BagsofHelp initiative!

We want to work with the local community and a local artist to develop a mosaic near the front of St Leonards Warrior Square station.

Please vote for Meet you by the Mosaic in stores during the months of March/April to help us secure a grant of up to £2,000.

New funds for our community garden

Great news. We were successful in our application for a Sustainability & New Economy Grant from Quakers UK.  We will receive £200 to help fund the development of our community garden at St Leonards Warrior Square station, specifically around the water collection.

There is no water supply close to the garden and we so for the past few years volunteers have been carrying buckets of water across the foot bridge to top up water needs over the spring and summer months. We’re really excited to be able to take control of the water supply by purchasing some large water butts for the north platform. These will allow volunteers to spend more time focusing on planning,  designing and planting.

Your Plants Will Grow High Next Spring When You Use These Autumn Gardening Tips

By Clara Beaufort

Horticulture knows no such thing as time off. There’s work to do right now if you want your flowers and vegetables to enjoy lush, healthy growth when warm weather returns. Use the tips in this post as your guide to gardening success.

Clean up the Dirt

Start your autumn chores by removing dead or dying plants from your garden beds. Give the remains a close look-see for evidence of mold or blight. If you see such signs, then burn the infected plants. If you don’t, then add them to the compost pile so they can work for you all winter long. Remove any foreign matter and give the soil a good, deep raking or tilling to break up clumps and aid aeration. Taking these steps now will lay the groundwork for next year’s harvest, according to the experts at Mother Earth News.

Mulch in Moderation

Too much of anything is a bad thing; that includes mulch. You should add a thin layer to your beds on top of 1-2 inches of compost. Anything more can actually work against you by preventing the cold from killing mold and blight.

While you’ve got your hands in the dirt, remove the roots of weeds like Bermuda grass and nutsedge. Otherwise these pests can overwinter in your garden to menace you next year, according to the gardening gurus at DIY Network.

Water Ahead of Time

Hard winter soil can block rain and melting snow from nourishing the roots of your trees and shrubs, according to Better Homes and Gardens. So get the jump on frost by giving these plants a generous watering now. This will act like the hump on a camel’s back, providing much-needed moisture throughout the cold season.

Don’t Forget Your Lawn

Autumn is for fertilizing your grass. Turf can store nutrients over the winter, digesting them in a gradual process that will help to ensure greener results next spring. You should aerate your lawn before winter cold sets in.

Consider Planting Cover Crops

Plants like hairy vetch and cereal rye can safeguard your soil over a long, severe winter, making them good choices for cover crops. Just make sure you till them into the ground next spring before they go to seed. This is a favorite trick of organic gardeners, according to Rodales. The seeds are small and even modest rainfall can help to establish them in the soil, making this idea almost effortless to implement.

Handling Hardscape Maintenance

The term “hardscape” refers to stone walkways, retaining walls, and other non-organic elements of a garden or landscape design. While less fragile than living plants, these structures do need annual care. This should include:

  • An autumn inspection to correct imperfections that could lead to trouble down the road. For example, a crack in a walkway might seem like a small thing. But it may become a trip hazard should water enter it and freeze, forcing the stone or masonry to expand. You should also look, not only for cracks, but for soil or stone cavities alongside or under hardscape. Otherwise wintertime precipitation could fill the gap and turn to ice, creating a problem called “frost heave” which can damage or even destroy hardscape.
  • A general sweeping to remove foreign matter, followed up with a washdown from a garden hose or pressure washer. This will discourage the growth of mold or mildew, which can deface hard surfaces.

Performing these needed steps will protect your garden and your landscape features from winter’s wrath. So give it your best, then brush off the dirt off your pants and start planning for next spring.

 

Guest blogger: Clara Beaufort

Gardenergigs.com

Gardening And Your Health: How Working In The Dirt Can Have A Positive Impact

Gardening is a favorite pastime for many people, but it’s not just a hobby that yields pretty results; it’s also a great way to get in shape and improve your mental health at the same time.

Working in the sunshine, creating something beautiful that also has tangible rewards, and doing something physical after working in an office or other fairly inactive environment can have many benefits for your health, not the least of which is the fact that you get in a workout every time you go into the garden. Bending, kneeling, stretching, weeding, watering, planting, and reaping all take a measure of physical strength and endurance and allow you to work several muscle groups at once, which makes it a great activity for those living with arthritis or joint pain because you can customize your movements and only do as much as your body will let you.

Of course, having a garden also benefits the planet in many ways, so you really can’t go wrong. If you’ve never thought of yourself as someone with a green thumb, now may be the time to reconsider and get to planting. Here are some of the best benefits of having a garden and tending it.

You get to work outside

Working outside in the sunshine gives you a boost of vitamin D, which has been shown in studies to help with stress, depression and other mood disorders. Gardening allows for plenty of fresh air while giving you the option to work only as hard as you want, so it can be done by just about anyone, regardless of their abilities or mobility concerns.

You’ll eat healthier

If you choose to plant edibles in your garden, pick things you know you’ll eat so that nothing goes to waste. Tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and peppers are all great options that are relatively easy to grow depending on your climate, and you can harvest quite a few of them. Think about foods that you can grow nearly year-round, as well; beans, broccoli, turnips, and squash are great choices for a fall harvest.

If you’re interested in year-round crops, you might also consider building a solar greenhouse that will help you keep your plants healthy and abundant during all kinds of weather. Make sure you have the space in your yard and check with the city to see if you need a permit to build.

You can boost your mental health

Many people who garden report a positive boost in their mental health, especially people who spend a lot of time in an office setting or don’t get to work with their hands much. There’s something relaxing about working in the dirt and knowing which move comes next, spending time choosing the right plants and watching them grow under your care, and it can help boost your self-esteem, as well.

It can help your memory

Seniors who garden are more likely to battle the risk of Alzheimer’s and other cognitive function disorders because the act of working outdoors and planting helps the brain stay active and vital. Not only that, but many studies have shown that people who work in the garden have a reduced risk of stroke.

Remember that gardening can include heavy lifting and other physical work, so ask for help if you need it. Always wear sunblock and wear light-colored layers of clothing in the summer to stay cool. Being prepared and careful will help you get the most benefits out of working in the dirt.

Maria Cannon © 2017